Stories

Shibori
The Place of Zen by Materialised

shibori-japanese-materialised

The Place of Zen is a new collection by Materialised in collaboration with ‘Shibori’ in Australia.

‘Shibori’ is Pepa Martin and Karen Davis, who have been practicing their craft for over fifteen years using traditional Japanese techniques. The Place of Zen is a collection they have worked on with Materialised for several years to develop these beautiful designs.

Materialised-memo-samples-mood-board

Shibori dyeing produces a particularly organic result: designs are repetitive yet with charming imperfections. And each mark, detail and texture from the dyeing is translated digitally onto Materialised’s base cloths and wall coverings.

Shibori designs are poetic, they have rhythm, texture and depth. “Love Note”, upon the wall here, has a lovely tempo.

materialised-wall-panelling-upholstery
Cherry-blossom-fabric-for-cushions
Materialised-dots-fabric
paper-folding-interior-design-shibori
Materialised-contract-shibori
Materialised-tie-dyed-fabric
charcoal-black-and-white
Indigo-colour-textile-interior
olive-green-dots
textured-fabric-interior-design

For this collection there are nine designs and multiple earthy colour-ways. We can print onto a large variety of fire resistant base cloths including day curtains and vinyl wall coverings. To view the entire collection and more from Materialised visit their website: Discover Materialised

Day-curtains-materialised-mountains

Shibori literally means “to wring, squeeze or press”.  It is an ancient Japanese manual tie-dyeing technique which remains extremely popular today with many artisans, including the “Shibori” team in Australia.  Pictured here is their “Mountains” panel design on curtains.

Shibori-throw-pillows
Bed-throw-shibori

There are many ways to create shibori, with techniques generally grouped into three categories based upon how they resist the dye: kōkechi, tied or bound, rōkechi, waxed and kyōkechi, where the fabric is folded and clamped between two carved wooden blocks.

Making-shibori-techniques

Click to learn more about the art of ‘Shibori’ and this lovely collection.

Shibori-colour-palette

Materialised’s products are suitable for projects where there is high traffic, fabrics are fire retardant and many stain resistant.  Their selection of fabrics is large and diverse. Discover Materialised

The Place of Zen is a new collection by Materialised in collaboration with ‘Shibori’ in Australia.

‘Shibori’ is Pepa Martin and Karen Davis, who have been practicing their craft for over fifteen years using traditional Japanese techniques. The Place of Zen is a collection they have worked on with Materialised for several years to develop these beautiful designs.

contemporary-asian-design-curtains

Shibori dyeing produces a particularly organic result: designs are repetitive yet with charming imperfections. And each mark, detail and texture from the dyeing is translated digitally onto Materialised’s base cloths and wall coverings.

materialised-wall-panelling-upholstery

Shibori designs are poetic, they have rhythm, texture and depth. “Love Note”, upon the wall here, has a lovely tempo.

Cherry-blossom-design
Materialised-dots-fabric
geometric-upholstery-fabric
Materialised-contract-shibori
Materialised-tie-dyed-fabric
Shibouri-tie-dyeing
Indigo-colour-textile-interior
Textile-design-dots
textured-fabric-interior-design

For this collection there are nine designs and multiple earthy colour-ways. We can print onto a large variety of fire resistant base cloths including day curtains and vinyl wall coverings. To view the entire collection and more from Materialised visit their website: Discover Materialised

Day-curtains-materialised-mountains

Shibori literally means “to wring, squeeze or press”.  It is an ancient Japanese manual tie-dyeing technique which remains extremely popular today with many artisans, including the “Shibori” team in Australia.  Pictured here is their “Mountains” panel design on curtains.

Shibori-throw-pillows
Bed-throw-shibori

There are many ways to create shibori, with techniques generally grouped into three categories based upon how they resist the dye: kōkechi, tied or bound, rōkechi, waxed and kyōkechi, where the fabric is folded and clamped between two carved wooden blocks.

Making-shibori-techniques
Shibori-colour-palette

Materialised’s products are suitable for projects where there is high traffic, fabrics are fire retardant and many stain resistant.  There selection of fabrics is large and diverse. Discover Materialised

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